MEDIA CONNECT Deskscape Series: What’s On Partner & Director of MC Satellite Kristin Clifford Creedle’s Desk?

The following article is a part of our Deskscape Series. Many of us spend up to eight or nine hours at our desks per day, making our “deskscapes” a creative reflection of the book publicity work we do for our clients every day.

 

Partner & Director of MC Satellite Kristin Clifford Creedle shares some of her favorite parts of her deskscape:

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Working from home has allowed me to better balance my two worlds: new mom and Partner at MEDIA CONNECT… and I’m forever grateful!

Having just settled into my new desk after my maternity leave I haven’t had much time to decorate my new office space, but there are two items sitting on my desk that never fail to make me smile. One is a picture taken of my husband and I on our wedding day, and the other is an adorable calendar my mother gave to me for Christmas this year. This month features two bright pink seahorses giving each other a little smooch.

After a client call, writing a new business proposal, brainstorming or hashing out the latest billing, it helps to be able to look around and clear my head. For me, most days that now means taking a few steps into the living room and visiting my 6-month-old twins, Vivienne and Liam, but for those moments when there’s no time to take even five minutes I can take two seconds and recall the thrill I felt on the day I got married, and that in turn reminds me of how lucky I am today.

And then there are those times when my household comes to visit me… my cat Lily has decided that she’s my new co-worker and often settles herself in my inbox. I can’t say she’s very helpful but she’s guaranteed to make me smile.

 

Related: MEDIA CONNECT Deskscape Series: What’s On Associate Publicist Emily Labes’s Desk?

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MEDIA CONNECT Deskscape Series: What’s On Digital Publicist Johanna Dickson’s Desk?

The following article is a part of our Deskscape Series. Many of us spend up to eight or nine hours at our desks per day, making our “deskscapes” a creative reflection of the book publicity work we do for our clients every day.

Digital Publicist Johanna Dickson shares some of her favorite parts of her deskscape:

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I’ve been known to personalize my spaces wherever I’ve worked. I abhor blank walls and much prefer to fill my cube with photos of my favorite people and places. The collage wall is full of holiday cards, drawings by my little cousins, art prints, and photos of my family and our pets. I have several little photos of my dog Molly around my desk to keep me smiling all day long.  The oddest thing at my desk has to be the Bat Boy bobble head doll my best friend got me years ago for my birthday. It was too creepy to display in my bedroom and so I moved him here. He’s a good conversation starter, although he’s slightly hidden in case a client happens to stop by.

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Lastly, many people here know my obsession with dinosaurs (Jurassic Park is my favorite movie of all time) and so this little green dinosaur was a must-have item for my work desk. He holds a little note in his mouth with all my current client codes. I reference it daily when making client calls and sending out books.

-Johanna Dickson

 

Related: MEDIA CONNECT Deskscape Series: What’s On Senior Publicist Adrienne Fontaine’s Desk?

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MEDIA CONNECT Deskscape Series: What’s On Associate Publicist Emily Labes’s Desk?

The following article is a part of our Deskscape Series. Many of us spend up to eight or nine hours at our desks per day, making our “deskscapes” a creative reflection of the book publicity work we do for our clients every day.

Associate Publicist Emily Labes shares some of her favorite parts of her deskscape:


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“I’ve been a part of our team’s Take Your Children to Work Day activity for the last two years. Since we’re the book division, we printed out black and white images of our favorite children’s book covers and had the kids color them in while we played Mad Libs. Even though Take Your Children to Work Day comes but once a year, I keep the crayons in a prominent spot on my desk year-round for a few reasons. First, and most importantly, they remind me how lucky I am to work at a company that allows me the freedom to exercise my creativity. Looking at them also helps quell my massive Peter Pan complex; as clichéd as it may be, I like knowing that while I may not be able to stay young forever, I can always be young at heart.

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MEDIA CONNECT Deskscape Series: What’s On Senior Publicist Adrienne Fontaine’s Desk?

 

The following article is a part of our Deskscape Series. Many of us spend up to eight or nine hours at our desks per day, making our “deskscapes” a creative reflection of the book publicity work we do for our clients every day.

Senior Publicist Adrienne Fontaine shares one of her favorite parts of her deskscape:

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“The Twizzler-shaped object on the left is my iSound speaker, which provides my soundtrack to the day, daily news, and Skype audio. It’s a bit of modern design that goes well with what a colleague calls my “Merv Griffin chairs.” The mug on the right featuring the one-and-only David Bowie as the Goblin King keeps me energized and inspired, courtesy of Johanna Dickson. The real magic happens when I listen to Bowie while drinking coffee.”

-Adrienne Fontaine

 

Related: Meet Our MEDIA CONNECT Team: Adrienne Fontaine

 

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Scott Olster of Fortune

OlsterQ&A

The following Q&A appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To subscribe for future editions, click here.

 

MEDIA CONNECT: How do you prefer to be contacted? Phone, fax, e-mail? Are there specific days or time of days that you prefer to be contacted? (i.e. What are your cut-off times before and after the show?)
Scott Olster
: E-mail is always best.

 

MC: What do you want to see and when? Catalogs? Galleys? Finished books? Do you want to see all books or only select titles? Please be as specific as possible.
SO: 
I prefer to receive galleys or review books as far in advance as possible. Ideally, electronic copies.

 

MC: What is your lead-time? How far in advance would you like to know about upcoming books?
SO:
 3 months or so is ideal.

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Ray Hennessy of Entrepreneur.com

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The following Q&A appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To subscribe for future editions, click here.

 

MEDIA CONNECT: How do you prefer to be contacted? Phone, fax, email? Are there specific days or time of days that you prefer to be contacted? (i.e. What are your cut-off times before and after the show?)
Ray Hennessy:
 I prefer to be contacted via e-mail — anytime.

 

MC: What do you want to see and when? Catalogs? Galleys? Finished books? Do you want to see all books or only select titles? Please be as specific as possible.
RH:
 We receive a large volume of books each day, many of which go unread; therefore, it’s best for you to reach out to an editor directly with a short pitch and see if there’s any interest before you send. Topics of greatest interest to us include leadership, productivity and management. We accept both galleys and finished books.

 

MC: What is your lead-time? How far in advance would you like to know about upcoming books?
RH:
 As an online publication, we are able to work quickly. Ideally, we’d like to receive two to three weeks’ notice before a book drops so we can coordinate coverage accordingly.

 

MC: Do you prefer to deal with one person at each house? If so, who? Or are you open to contact from individual publicists?
RH:
 I’m open to contact from individual publicists.

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Martin Zwilling of Startup Professionals

ZwillingQ&A

The following Q&A appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To subscribe for future editions, click here.

 

MEDIA CONNECT: Do you prefer being pitched by email or are you open to phone calls?
Martin Zwilling: 
Email only.

MC: Are there specific days or time of day that you prefer being contacted?
MZ:
 No preference.

MC: What business topics currently interest you the most?
MZ:
 Entrepreneurs, startups, business leadership.

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Jim Pawlak of Biz Books

PawlakQ&A

The following Q&A appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To subscribe for future editions, click here.

 

MEDIA CONNECT: Do you prefer being pitched by email or are you open to phone calls?
Jim Pawlak:
 Email.

 

MC: What business topics currently interest you the most?
JP:
 Anything of broad appeal to readers; that said, I don’t review books on ethics/governance/Boards and personal finance/investments.

 

MC: Do you like receiving galleys?
JP
: No.

 

MC: Do you prefer physical or e-versions of a book?
JP: 
Physical only.

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Skip Prichard of Leadership Insights

PrichardQ&A

The following Q&A appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To subscribe for future editions, click here.

 

MEDIA CONNECT: What is your background and interest in books?
Skip Prichard: 
Today, I am the CEO of OCLC, a global technology company serving libraries. Previously, I was the CEO of Ingram Content Group, the largest trade book wholesaler and also Lightning Source. I have a lifelong love affair with books and read a book a day (no sleep!).

A few years ago, I launched my blog, Leadership Insights, to share ideas and inspiration from people I meet and books I read.

 

skipQuoteMC: Do you prefer being pitched by email or are you open to phone calls? Do you like receiving galleys? Do you prefer physical or e-versions of a book?
SP: 
As a busy CEO who is traveling extensively, phone calls are impossible. You can contact me via “email” from my blog site. My team monitors email and can help answer questions. If the author is not interested in a written interview (or in person), then do not send a book. Though I own multiple devices, I prefer written galleys if they are available.

 

MC: What business topics currently interest you the most?
SP:
 We look at topics that interest a wide variety of readers. We rarely feature self-published authors. Questions we ask: Will this article make a difference in someone’s life? Make them more effective or a better leader? Will they be able to run a better meeting or learn effective communication techniques?

Our filter is whether it will serve the audience. It is an honor to provide the opportunity to enhance people’s lives.

 

MC: What’s the most common mistake publicists make when approaching you?
SP: 
We tend to work only with the best in the business. I personally enjoy developing a rapport and building a relationship.

For those who have not worked with us, I would say that the top 3 mistakes are:
1. Expecting a book review. I don’t do book reviews. I read every book before it is featured, then send a list of questions. Alternatively, we accept guest posts. There are some books I read that I do not think fit the audience and then we decline.
2. Expect a telephone interview I don’t do them. I don’t transcribe them. If I did, the results would be poor.
3. Sending a book without a commitment for an interview. My time is valuable. Don’t send a book if you don’t want an interview.

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Harvey Schachter of The Globe and Mail

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The following Q&A appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To subscribe for future editions, click here.

 

MEDIA CONNECT: Do you prefer being pitched by email or are you open to phone calls?
Harvey Schachter: 
Email is perfect — asynchronous. Phone is a disturbance, and my reaction ranges from displeasure to intense displeasure.

 

MC: Are there specific days or time of day that you prefer being contacted?
HS: 
Nope. Nor do I think there are times that are more advantageous to you. I might read more when I’m less preoccupied, but that varies every week and day. The key remains to grab me at the start of your pitch.

 

harveyQuoteMC: What business topics currently interest you the most?
HS: 
I am looking for things that are novel. Newspapers are supposed to be about what’s new — it’s embedded in the name. Beyond that, I want something provocative, that will catch my reader’s attention and make them think. Insightful is good. So is entertaining. But new, or if old a fresh spin that makes it new. That being said, something I have just written about is by definition is not new when I am pitched on it a day later by somebody who read the paper. Even something in the news already is by definition not new when the inevitable pitch comes in. I was a newspaper editor and know that for big news there is frenzy — my first newspaper, as a reporter, was The Toronto Star, which is expert at flooding readers with extensive coverage of something hot. Readers probably like that for major news, although it can be overdone. But I think for what I write about, it’s different. I prefer a cafeteria approach, changing the menu regularly. You’ll notice I haven’t mentioned any subject area, because that doesn’t matter. If it’s novel and perhaps also provocative or insightful or entertaining, I’m paying attention. If not, well, I’m not.

 

MC: What’s the most common mistake publicists make when approaching you?
HS: 
Pitching stuff that’s old: “I saw your column yesterday on X and my client, Y, can speak on the topic.” Also, not specifying what the person will actually say or talking about it in grandiose rather than practical terms that I let alone my readers can understand. A surprising amount of times I haven’t got the foggiest notion what the pitch is offering, given the abstract, high-sounding terms. For me to understand what is actually novel-provocative-insightful-entertaining I want a lot of specific bullet points on where we are going with the topic. A lot of bullet points, let me stress, since some won’t ignite me! I also am not big on surveys that tell me what I know as justification for a story. And finally, I hate a pitch from somebody I barely know or don’t know at all that begins, “I hope you are having a great day.” Pardon me if I view those good wishes as insincere, and if they sour me to the writer, who I now see as inauthentic and lose some trust in. Just get to the point and don’t waste my time. (And, oh yeah, don’t pitch a second time to me, with a follow-up. I read you the first time. Maybe other journalists and editors don’t but I do, and you are coming close to being labelled junk mail.) Do you like receiving galleys? Do you prefer physical or e-versions of a book? I prefer to operate from the actual books, to time the review better and know my quotes — I like to quote — are accurate. So unless I ask for a galley, please hold back for the full book.

 

MC: What is your policy on running byline articles or guest blogs?
HS:
 The Globe and Mail will do that but I’m a freelancer and don’t have the power to run a bylined article or guest blogs. But a lot of my stuff comes from blogs or articles, where if the writer wants I will interview them on the topic and use the interview and written material in a column. That seems to work well, for both of us and, most importantly, the readers. It gives me a much better sense of where the column will be going, compared to “my client is willing to talk on topic X.” So please send me such material, but not with the expectation I can print it with a byline, as it is — that goes to Globe editors.

 

MC: Do you ever feature self-published authors?
HS:
 Certainly. Always have. But interestingly, for my book review column while the number of self-published books are increasing dramatically the number I feature isn’t — might even be going down. My sense is that the quality of such books isn’t what it was five and certainly 10 years ago. Too easy to self-publish, I suspect, now compared to the past. Too many books much like other books. But I still glance at them.

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