6 Things To Tweet During #NaNoWriMo

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By Anna Patrick, Digital Publicist and Social Media Strategist

 

For many hopeful authors November 1st means more than just Halloween candy clearance sales. It means more than Q4 deadlines at work, or the first month of the holiday season. November 1st marks the start of NaNoWriMo, or National Novel Writing Month, where writers endeavor to write an entire 50,000-word novel in one month.

This sleepless, caffeine-addled, frenzied event costs writers about 1,667 words per day for the ultimate chance to get their full novel out of their head and onto digital paper – along with hundreds of thousands of fellow writers as a constant support system. The program was founded by Chris Baty in 1999, and it started with four writers from the San Francisco Bay area. Last year nearly 400,000 writers participated.

The sense of community can be particularly felt on social media, specifically on Twitter. #NaNoWriMo trended nationally for nearly the entire month, and millions of tweets went out describing how close (or how far) participating writers were from the finish line, offering words of encouragement for other writers, or even revealing one or two sentences they had written that day that they were proud of.

The event has grown so much that parody Twitter accounts have popped up, such as the popular @NaNoWriMo_txt, which parodies some of the more outlandish or hilarious things that are said in NaNoWriMo forums or other tweets.

While 30 days can seem like too short a time to pen a successful masterpiece, the goal of NaNoWriMo is to write a draft, get writers to break their patterns of overthinking or over editing, and to take a more freeform “think now, edit later” approach to writing. However, some masterpieces do break through. Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen is one example. Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell is another.

 

So how can authors maximize their time spent on Twitter while NaNo rages on to provide meaningful content? Here’s how NaNoWriMo participants can engage on Twitter:

-Tweet out your starting word count for the day, then tweet out your ending word count for the day after your writing session. After your last tweet, browse the feed for others in a similar bracket as you, and give them a shoutout.

-Tweet out your favorite sentence (or two) that you wrote that day. A bonus for keeping it under 140 characters so when others re-tweet they can include a word or two of praise.

-Favorite or re-tweet tweets you like from other writers. The NaNo community thrives off of communication and positive support, so extending this hand to others will help ensure that you get the same in return.

-Tweet out words of encouragement. Whether they’re your own, or famous writing quotes from great writers.

-Ask for advice. If you’re stuck, ask for help. #NaNoWriMo tweeters are responsive, and have likely been in the same place. Not sure of a character name? Ask! Instead of falling into a pitfall of distractions Googling for an answer, ask a support system 400,000+ strong for their opinions.

-Give a tip that worked for you that day. Whether it’s something that helped you shut out distractions, or a new blend of coffee that kept you writing for an additional hour, tips go a long way.

 

The prize? If you verify reaching over 50,000 words on the official website, you are eligible for two paperback copies of your work. The grand prize: bragging rights, a sense of accomplishment, and a whole new set of #NaNoWriMo friends and followers.

 

Related: 10 Authors You Need to Follow on Twitter and their Strategies Worth Stealing

 

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4 Ways Authors Can Use Pinterest To Maximize Book Publicity

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By Anna Patrick, Digital Publicist and Social Media Strategist

The following set of best practice tips appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To view our fall newsletter or to subscribe for future editions, click here.

 

Pinterest has been hailed as the fastest growing social media platform of the last year, rivaling Instagram, by outlets such a Business Insider, CNN and Mashable. Content sharing on Pinterest jumped to 19.2 percent just this time last year, and is continuing to see a usage spike.

With this kind of popularity, more and more authors — and readers — are finding their way to Pinterest. Broken down, Pinterest is essentially a virtual pinboard, which allows users to “pin” images found on the web that can hyperlink back to websites.

Here are a few ways that authors can use Twitter to maximize book publicity:

 

Don’t neglect your “About” section. This is a critical element of your profile that will help Pinners identify and follow you. Be sure to include your name or penname, your titles, genres, and a compelling short description of your title(s). Make sure to add your author website URL as well as your Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Create multiple pinboards for your book. Instead of just creating one general board for all things related to your book, breaking up boards will help you gain a broader following by expanding your pins across multiple boards with different subjects. Pinterest categorizes all pinboards by subject, such as “Film, Music & Books,” “Quotes,” “Travel,” “Art” and more. For example, create a pinboard of quotes from your book, a board of “places” (locations or settings) where scenes in your book take place, articles and reviews about your book, and a board of upcoming cover art or fan art.

 

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: King Kaufman of SiriusXM Radio

The following interview with King Kaufman appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To view our fall newsletter or to subscribe for future editions, click here.

King Kaufman is the host of CONTENT IS KING, broadcast weekdays 6-7 pm ET on Sirius 93, XM 208, SiriusXM. He is also the Writing Program Manager for BleacherReport and has also written for The New York Times, the San Francisco Examiner and Salon.com. His work has been anthologized in “Top of the Order: 25 Writers Pick Their Favorite Baseball Player of All Time” (Da Capo, 2010), “Afterwords: Stories and Reports From 9/11 and Beyond” (Washington Square, 2002), “Iron Mike: A Mike Tyson Reader” (Da Capo, 2002) and “Dialogues: An Argument Rhetoric and Reader, 4th Edition” (Longman, 2003). He graduated from Berkeley with a history degree and a master’s in journalism.

 

kingkaufMEDIA CONNECT: What book are you reading right now?
King Kaufman: THOSE GUYS HAVE ALL THE FUN. I’m a little late to it, I know. I’m listening to it.

 

MC: What’s your biggest pet peeve when working with publicists?
KK: Calling me on the phone if I haven’t specifically asked them to do so or told them it’s OK to do so. This rarely happens, but I hate it when it does.

 

MC: What types of books are you tired of covering? What are you hoping to do more of?
KK: I’m interested in books that explain process, how things happen. I enjoyed Jason Kendall’s THROWBACK, even though his personality shined through as abrasive and unpleasant, because he took the reader through what a catcher is thinking and how he approaches the game. “If I see the batter’s moved his back foot up two inches, I’ll know…”

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Alexander Kaufman of HuffPo Business

The following interview with Alexander Kaufman appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To view our fall newsletter or to subscribe for future editions, click here.

Alexander C. Kaufman is an associate editor on The Huffington Post’s business desk. Previously, he worked as a staff reporter at the International Business Times, The Wrap and The Boston Globe.

 

AKaufmanMC: What book are you reading right now?
Alexander C. Kaufman: I’m reading THE POWERHOUSE by Steve LeVine, a journalist at Quartz. I’m also reading Haruki Murakami’s NORWEGIAN WOOD. I just finished THE WILD SHEEP CHASE by Murakami, so I’m really into him right now.

 

MC: When you’re not at the office, what do you like to do?
AK: I like to read, go for hikes, practice meditation, drink beer in pubs with my friends, cook, take pictures, and eat exotic foods.

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Elisha Hartwig of Mashable

The following interview with Elisha Hartwig appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To view our fall newsletter or to subscribe for future editions, click here.

Elisha Hartwig is an Associate Editor at Mashable’s New York City headquarters, where she researches and writes branded content. She graduated with degrees in both English literature and Spanish literature from the University of Oregon. After graduation, she moved to Madrid for one year where she taught English and traveled extensively before moving to New York. Follow her @ElishaHartwig.

 

EHartwigMEDIA CONNECT: What book are you reading right now?
ELISHA HARTWIG: I am reading SUPER SAD TRUE LOVE STORY by Gary Shteyngart

 

MC: When you’re not at the office, what do you like to do?
EH: I’m probably at home reading, running or binge-watching a new television show – although traveling is my favorite hobby.

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Jason Katzman, Editor at Skyhorse Publishing

The following interview with Rob Kirkpatrick appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To view our fall newsletter or to subscribe for future editions, click here.

Jason Katzman currently works for Skyhorse Publishing, mainly on their sports (Sports Publishing) and science fiction (Night Shade Book, Talos Press) imprints, and is located in New York City. He has edited several New York Times bestsellers.

 

JasonKatzmanMEDIA CONNECT: What inspired you to want to become an editor?
JASON KATZMAN: I really didn’t know what I wanted to do until I had already graduated college. That’s when I spent all my time reading and writing. I always enjoyed helping family and friends on various projects, so felt that being able to work on the written word, use my creative intuitiveness, and help bring special projects to the masses was a role I’d do well in. Once I got my foot in the door I knew that this was my career, and I haven’t looked back since.

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Rob Kirkpatrick, Senior Editor at Thomas Dunne Books

The following interview with Rob Kirkpatrick appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To view our fall newsletter or to subscribe for future editions, click here.

Rob Kirkpatrick is Senior Editor with Thomas Dunne Books, an imprint of St. Martin’s Press, where he focuses primarily in narrative nonfiction. He has been in the book publishing industry for sixteen years and has also held senior acquisition positions with Lyons Press and Greenwood Press. Rob’s titles have made numerous bestseller lists and year-end lists and won several awards. He is also the author of his own books, including 1969: The Year Everything Changed.

 

kirkpatrickMEDIA CONNECT: What inspired you to want to become an editor?
Rob Kirkpatrick: I think I’ve wanted to be involved in publishing, in one way or another, ever since I was in elementary school. Back then, my dream job would have been to write Star Wars spinoffs like Alan Dean Foster and Brian Daley were doing at the time. I remember asking my fourth grade teacher if she knew the address to Random House.

 

MC: How has the editorial field changed during your career?
RK: The fall of Borders and the rise of ebooks have changed the industry greatly. And everything has changed since 2008, of course.

 

MC: As an acquiring editor do you look at the author’s work or platform first?
RK: Absolutely, especially as I acquire primarily nonfiction. I remember a proposal I received several years ago for a book from an author whose most recent book had sold quite modestly. I would have needed a way to position the author and his next book more effectively. The proposal neglected to mention what the author did for a living, so I inquired. The agent, an experienced one, asked me, “Why do you need to know?” That response floored me and still does. An author’s profession and platform are always relevant when trying to plan how to publish his or her book.

 

MC: What are some of the favorite books you’ve edited over the years?
RK: It’s hard to narrow your own list down, and of course a book can be among your favorites for different reasons. But several highlights include: SHRINKAGE by Bryan Bishop, THE WRECKING CREW by Kent Hartman, BIG HAIR AND PLASTIC GRASS by Dan Epstein, PRODIGAL FATHER, PAGAN SON by LT Menginie and Kerrie Droban, THE PEASANT PRINCE by Alex Storozynski, THE KENNEDY CHRONICLES by Kennedy, and STRANGE TRIBE by John Hemingway.

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Author Q&A: Founder and CEO of SCOTTeVEST Shares His Small Business Success Story In Debut Book

“You’re so full of crap,” said Mark Cuban to the equally brash Scott Jordan, CEO of SCOTTeVEST, on ABC-TV’s Shark Tank. What Scott Jordan is really full of is passion, energy, ideas, and pockets – all of which are topics in his new book, Pocket Man: The Unauthorized Autobiography of a Passionate, Personal Promoter Who Created A $50 Million Pocket Empire, just released on Amazon yesterday.

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Pocket Man takes us through not only what really happened on Shark Tank (he turned down a million-dollar offer for a portion of his company) but in real life. He made the leap to entrepreneur by following through on an idea that was ripe for its time in the year 2000 – developing clothing so people can wear or carry their electronic devices. Wearable tech.  Simple yet significant, his inventive product has yielded $50 million in revenue. INC magazine recognized his cutting-edge company to be one of the fastest-growing companies in America.

In the following Q&A, Jordan shows us what happens when one follows his passion all the way to the bank while inventing a cool, practical product that serves the needs of our technology-engaged society.

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: John Duff, Senior VP and Publisher, Perigee Books

The following interview with John Duff appeared in the the latest edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To view our fall newsletter or to subscribe for future editions, click here.

 

John started his career in the book business in the basement of a W.H. Smith book store in Toronto, Canada. Following stints with a number of Canadian publishers, he came to New York to become Director of Special Interest Publishing at Doubleday. In 1992 He joined G.P. Putnam’s Sons as Publisher of Perigee Books.

He also acquires and edits a range of prescriptive non-fiction titles. Amongst the highlights over the past two decades: Joanna Lund’s Healthy Exchanges series, which sold more than a million copies and gained her the unofficial title of “Queen of QVC.” He acquired the national bestsellers The Book of Useless Information and its many follow ups, Daniel Solin’s The Smartest Investment Book You’ll Ever Read and subsequent titles in this series of personal financial guides, and Goldie Hawn’s 10 Mindful Minutes. He is the long-time editor of public television’s Christina Pirello, whose books include Cooking the Whole Foods Way and the original Deluxe eBook Christina Pirello’s Wellness 1000.

Recent publications and acquisitions include Art Markman’s Smart Change, Brian Martin’s Invincible: The 10 Lies You Learn Growing Up with Domestic Violence, and the Truths to Set You Free, Ron Friedman’s The Best Place to Work, and Swoosie Kurtz’s memoir, Part Swan, Part Goose.

 

JohnDuffMEDIA CONNECT: What inspired you to want to become an editor?
JOHN DUFF: I more or less backed into it — starting out in publicity in a number of small publishers, picking up rights work along the way that eventually led to producing and selling illustrated co-editions with international partners, which then brought me to NY to take on the “special interest” publishing group at Doubleday. I never really thought of myself as an “editor” but took on this role along the way.

MC: How has the editorial field changed during your career?
JD: Key difference is the emphasis on the editor’s role as “brand manager” for each other. The editing process is relatively unchanged (except for the technical aspects as everyone moves to electronic editing and, somewhat reluctantly, away from pen and pencil). But no editor’s work ends here since each is involved with every aspect of the publication — production, marketing, publicity, etc. Beginning at the time of acquisition, editors now have to consider not only the quality of the work but all the market factors that will go into its success. (See next question)

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MEDIA CONNECT Interview Series: Ami Greko of Goodreads

The following interview with Ami Greko appeared in the premier edition of the MEDIA CONNECT newsletter. To view our summer newsletter or to subscribe for future editions, click here.

Ami is also founder of Book Camp NYC.

 

AmiGrekoMC:  What book are you reading right now?

AG:  I always like to read books of authors I think I might run into at BEA, so I’ve just finished the stunning, gorgeous Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel, and the hilarious Thrown, which is a nonfiction book about MMA fighters written by former philosophy PhD Kerry Howley. Both worth queuing up for galleys!

 

MC:  What is one of the best success stories you’ve experienced working with a publicist?

AG:  I work with amazing publicists from so many different areas of publishing! The biggest successes always come from people who are extremely enthusiastic about a title and are willing to keep trying to find a good angle for the author on Goodreads.

 

MC:  What’s your preferred lead time? Will you consider older, but timely titles?

AG:  I love hearing about older titles! Goodreads is a community of readers, so they are less concerned about things like publication date and more concerned with “is this a book I will enjoy?” Definitely think of Goodreads for paperback publication as well.

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